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Trends End, but Data Never Stops

What do Skype and Google+ have in common?

Innovation?

Yes.

Owned by companies commonly found in court with the U.S. government?

True.

But, as a network administrator, your concerns are far more basic. These are amongst a slew of products that are demanding more and more of your network resources, with VoIP, video, and other real-time IP-based communication (RTIPC). As the volume of traffic from these and other products increases, the need to migrate today’s core and distribution networks to 10G becomes far more critical.

Having a solution that is able to monitor and analyze real-time protocols simultaneously with IP data becomes more important than ever before, as real-time protocols are far more sensitive to latency, jitter, and packet-loss — regardless of their source. Furthermore, the ability to store analytical results for better benchmarking and further analysis is also essential.

Remember to keep these points in mind when choosing a network performance solution that will help alleviate the common ailments associated with monitoring and troubleshooting RTIPC on 10G networks.

Get visibility into what’s happening… NOW!

Being able to recognize what is traversing your 10G links in real-time is key. Remember to look for solutions that provide this visibility and top-down summaries as this will help with focused investigations if jitter, latency or packet-loss rears their ugly heads.

Don’t try putting a Band-Aid over a bullet wound.

Many network performance analysis solutions deal with 10G by simply adding 10G media interfaces into existing products which were never designed to handle 10G traffic. This is fine if you are not utilizing your entire 10G network. But you soon will be, and if this is the type of solution you have, you will lose critical data when you reach 3 – 4 Gbps utilization. Look for solutions that were purpose-built for 10G.

Look to the past to solve the present: streamline your data.

You need to have a solution that can automatically stream a copy of observed packets to disk. Having a forensic store can help you with detailed troubleshooting and reconstructive analysis over an extended period of time.

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