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More Data, More Problems?

Big data is perhaps the ultimate double-edged sword for businesses. On one hand, the ever-growing volume of information produced by contemporary technology contains valuable data companies can use to improve operations. For that reason, a wide array of verticals—from healthcare to financial services—are launching big data initiatives. On the other hand, the data needs to be stored somewhere and transmitted on the network. In fact, a recent report from Enterprise Management Associates revealed that “increased traffic load due to big data storage/backup” is the most common change observed to network behavior by respondents.

To meet these traffic and storage demands, many businesses are increasing their bandwidth, moving from 1G to 10/40 or even 100G networks. And although this makes them better-equipped to handle more information, the higher speed involved can make the network engineer’s job more difficult, as troubleshooting grows more complex.

Fortunately, organizations increasing their bandwidth now have access to tools that ensure excellent network performance. These network monitoring solutions help make certain that no packets are lost between the network and storage, and that network engineers have all the data they need for fast, accurate analysis. Data is available in real time for analysis and can also be recorded for post-capture network forensics that help engineers re-create disruptions or attacks and prevent similar incidents in the future.

By now, many executives understand full well the possibilities big data offers. But because networks are now the backbones of so many organizations, decision makers may feel that even valuable, actionable information isn’t worth risking network health. But with the right solution, businesses no longer have to choose between getting on the big data bandwagon and feeling confident about their networks.

Click here to download our white paper, “Managing Networks in the Age of the Cloud, SDN and Big Data: Network Management Megatrends 2014.”

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