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Savvius at the RSA Conference 2015

We’re back from this year’s RSA Conference in San Francisco. This is the largest security conference in the US. Over 40,000 people attended this year’s event. The sessions and exhibit halls were busy and crowded.

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In the photo above, Bob Chapman, our Sales Representative for the North West region, is using his powers of peermap vision to gain visibility and actionable intelligence about a potential customers network management requirements.

The conference was especially exciting for us, because it was our first public appearance as Savvius, which was well received at RSA. Attendees coming by the booth could see and feel the energy around the new, more savvy, company name, the enterprise branding, and the clear messaging about Savvius as a company, and our new products and solutions. What we like to call “Savvius 1.0” was executed and released in a very short period of time just prior to RSA, and is evidence that Savvius is on the fast track to being a leader in security forensics. The best example of this is the debut of Savvius Vigil, our new network security forensics appliance for storing months of packet-level information for enhancing security investigations.

Reaction to Savvius Vigil was extremely positive. RSA attendees are security professionals. Their daily work involves anticipating, defending against, investigating, and stopping data breaches. They understand how stealthy today’s security attacks are, and they know, first-hand, how long it can take to track down and characterize an attack using the tools available to most IT departments.

That’s why Savvius Vigil was such welcome news to them. Savvius Vigil stores the network traffic associated with alerts raised by SIEM products such as HP ArcSight.

Storing all network traffic for a large enterprise indefinitely just isn’t practical, but Savvius Vigil’s recording and indexing of just the traffic associated with security alerts gives RSA attendees and their security colleagues the data repository they’ve been looking for. It’s an in-depth record of suspicious network events with all extraneous data filtered out. It’s like a highlights reel of suspicious characters from a crime thriller.

“That makes perfect sense,” one attendee told us.

We think so, too.